Meet Kristina Daley!

This month we talked to Kristina Daley, LMSW, Coordinator of Permanency Services, about her work.

Describe your job in three words.
Creating Forever Families.

When did you start working at Spence-Chapin?
I started working at Spence-Chapin in January of 2016.

How did you become interested in adoption?
I’ve always been fascinated with adoption. As a former foster child who was raised by one family, adoption was never presented as an option. When the law changed to ensure a child does not languish in foster care like I did, I celebrated it, as there were many children who were being raised by a family that they saw as their own – but adoption was not an option until the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) made it one.

Why did you want to work at Spence-Chapin?
I enjoy working with families and children. Spence-Chapin enabled me to do both.

What’s a typical workday?
Meeting with families to conduct home study interviews, checking in with families who have adopted to assist with transitions and adjustments to parenting, and writing reports!

What is the most challenging part of your job?
Often, families come to adoption with specific expectations. For example, an older child may come with connections to birth family, possibly to another country, and to a past which did not include their adoptive family. I think this can sometimes be challenging for families to think about. Our team is here to support families throughout the process.

Is there a particular family that you’ve worked with that has affected you in any way?
We ask our parents to be open and sharing of their child’s adoption story and to maintain connections with birth families. They know that for the best interest of their child they must be open to connecting with and maintaining connections with birth parents. I enjoy my part in helping them figure out how to do this and lessen fears related to open adoption.

Has working at Spence-Chapin changed you in any way?
It has solidified my commitment to creating families whose foundation is built on empathy, being genuine and respectful.

To learn more about completing your home study with Spence-Chapin email us at or call us at 212-400-8150.

Meet Lauren Jiang!

This month we talked to Lauren Jiang, LMSW, Associate Director of Permanency Services, about her work.

When did you start working at Spence-Chapin?
February 10, 2014, after completing my Graduate Social Work Internship with Spence-Chapin’s post-adoption department.

Why did you want to work at Spence-Chapin?
I wanted (and still do!) to work at Spence-Chapin for its ethical approach to adoption. I could only ever see myself at an agency that welcomes all families regardless of age, race/ethnicity, religion, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, etc.

How did you become interested in adoption?
To me there is nothing more fundamentally influential to human development than the family you are raised in. In this field, we have the opportunity to help support healthy foundations for children, whether it’s helping to empower individuals to raise the children who are born to them, or preparing families to raise the children entrusted to them through adoption.

What’s your favorite part about being a home study social worker?
Carrying families from home study into post-placement is rewarding. It’s great to see a person’s dream to parent become a reality. I also love seeing that through the relationships we build with families that trust is established; through that trust, when the realities of parenting are hard, or if a parent is struggling with bonding with their new child, the parent feels safe coming to us with that so we can support them and help work through the challenge.

What is the most challenging part of your job?
It’s our job to dive deep with prospective adoptive parents and understand their life history in order to then talk through how that history may impact their future parenting. I think for those of us who are social workers, we came to the field with the belief that through challenges we can find strengths, and so we really work with families to build insight into how their own histories could support them as future parents.

Describe your job in three words.
Preparing & supporting families

Is there a particular family that you’ve worked with that has affected you in any way?
I think they all do. There isn’t a person in our office whose desk isn’t decorated with photos from the families we’ve help create.

To learn more about completing your home study with Spence-Chapin, email us at or call us at 212-400-8150.

Spence-Chapin’s Domestic Adoption Program



For over 100 years, Spence-Chapin has been finding loving adoptive parents for children in need of adoption in New York & New Jersey. In our domestic adoption program, our experienced staff will guide you through every step of the adoption process with the support you need as you grow your family through adoption.  Since the 1940s, Spence-Chapin has been a leader in African-American adoption. Spence-Chapin has placed over 20,000 children into loving, permanent families since the inception of our domestic adoption program.


Children in our Domestic Adoption Program include infants from newborn to approximately eight weeks of age at the time of placement.  The babies in this program reflect the racial and ethnic diversity of the birth families we serve with most children being of African-American and Latino backgrounds. Children in need of adoption often have risks and unknowns in their medical history. Some children have been exposed to cigarette smoke, recreational or prescription drugs and/or alcohol during pregnancy. Families adopting through this program need to be open to adopting a child of either gender.


  • Single parents, married & unmarried couples, heterosexual and LGBTQ parents are eligible to adopt
  • United States legal residents who are in good physical, mental and emotional health
  • Applicants over 50 years old should consult with Spence-Chapin
  • Spence-Chapin supports all adoptive and birth families in establishing an open adoption
  • Residents living within 100 miles of New York City, including all of New York City & Long Island, northern New Jersey, and the Hudson Valley


Open adoption is when adoptive and birth families meet and are able to have ongoing contact with each other at their own discretion. It is an opportunity for the birth and adoptive parents to develop a relationship that will benefit the adoptee. Spence-Chapin encourages open adoption, which can include the exchange of letters and photographs, emails, phone calls, and visits. Research shows that open adoption is beneficial for all members of the adoption constellation – birth family, adoptive family, and adoptees.


How do I apply?
The first step is to attend an upcoming domestic adoption webinar. Our staff will share details about domestic adoption at Spence-Chapin – who the children are in need of adoption, the matching process, options counseling and support for biological parents, open adoption, steps in the adoption process, and more. All webinar attendees will receive the adoption application.

Will I need a home study?
Yes! A home study document is required for all types of adoptions. Spence-Chapin has the expertise and accreditation to provide home study services for all people pursuing a domestic adoption in NY or NJ. Learn more.

How long will I wait to be matched with a child?
Families wait an average of 24 months after completing their home study.

What is the matching process?
Birth parents select an adoptive family by reviewing adoptive family profiles with their social workers. Once they have narrowed their choice to one family, a match meeting is held between the birth and adoptive parents with their social workers.

What adoption expenses should I be prepared for?
In addition to the application cost, the professional service fee for the domestic adoption program is $41,000. Join our next domestic adoption webinar to learn more or call us today about adoption expenses.

Will I need to travel?
Travel is limited in the Domestic Adoption Program. All birth and adoptive parents are residents of the NYC metro area, including Long Island, New Jersey, and the Hudson Valley.

Who are the birth mothers?
Any woman of childbearing age could find herself in the position of an unplanned pregnancy. Spence-Chapin’s experienced social workers provide intensive unbiased counseling to expectant parents around parenting options. Birth parents have a great deal of love for their children and come to Spence-Chapin for support in making a thoughtful plan for their child.

Who is eligible to adopt through Spence-Chapin’s Domestic Adoption Program?
United States legal residents living within 100 miles of New York City who are in good physical, mental and emotional health are eligible to adopt. This includes single parents, married & unmarried couples, heterosexual and LGBTQ parents.

Is it possible to adopt a baby domestically through an attorney? Do you offer that pathway?
Families pursuing a private, infant, domestic adoption often explore their two paths: an organization or independent/attorney adoption. Spence-Chapin has provided home studies for hundreds of families adopting independently and we have the expertise to work with you and your adoption attorney. We provide domestic home studies for organization or independent (attorney) adoptions. Spence-Chapin can provide recommendations for reputable adoption attorneys in the NYC area. Spence-Chapin provides home study and support services as you work closely with the attorney to navigate the legal process of adoption. Submit the home study application today to get started on the adoption paperwork.

Call 212-400-8150


Colombia Program Updates

Spence-Chapin’s fundamental belief is that Every Child Deserves a Family. Since 1994, we have been finding and preparing families to adopt children from Colombia, a Hague Convention country. Our agency is approved by the Instituto Colombiano de Bienestar Familiar (ICBF), the central authority for inter-country adoption and we are a Hague accredited agency with over 40 years of experience in international adoption.

Colombian Heritage Program

In July of 2017, we expanded our Colombia Program to find permanent, loving families of Colombian heritage for children in Colombia ages 0-4. Families of Colombian heritage who are between 25-45 years old may apply to adopt a child 0-4 years old.

How do you know if you are of Colombian heritage? This includes a person who was born in Colombia or with a parent born in Colombia. The adoptive parent would provide a Colombian birth certificate, passport, or Cedula to show this heritage. The estimated wait time for child referral after dossier submission by heritage families is 12-24 months.

Greatest Need of Adoption in Colombia –Children with Special Needs and Sibling Groups

We continue to seek American families living anywhere in the United States who are drawn to Colombia as the country to build their families and who will embrace the process of incorporating Colombian culture into the life of their family going forward. Our agency remains committed to finding families for children in the greatest need of adoption in Colombia, including toddlers and school-age children with significant medical needs, such as Down syndrome, HIV, and developmental delays. Children may live in small private adoption houses or in larger institutions where they have access to the support of social workers and psychologists. After paperwork is submitted to Colombia, adoptive families are typically matched with a child in need of adoption within 6-12 months.

Support and Guidance for the Lifetime of Your Family

Many adoptive families are drawn to Colombia as it’s a country with beauty in its people, landscape and culture. However, the fears, unknowns, and myths surrounding the adoption of school-age children, children with special needs and sibling groups discourage many prospective parents. Spence-Chapin offers myriad of services during the adoption process to encourage and support adoptive parents to overcome these barriers. Our social workers assist families in taking inventory of their individual, family and community strengths and determining various resources available to help their child and family thrive. We take great care in helping adoptive parents anticipate the needs of the child in order to develop a resource plan for parenting children in the areas of medical, school, mental health, parenting, attachment, sibling preparation, home, support system, stress reduction, self-care and budgeting.

Following placement of a child or sibling group from Colombia, Spence-Chapin is available for support and guidance for the lifetime of your family. Our Modern Family Center offers counseling, parent coaching, post adoption support, mentorship and birthland trips.

Children in Colombia are waiting for you! We would love to tell you more about our program in Colombia. We welcome families living anywhere in the United States to call us at 212-400-8150 to speak with our international adoption staff. Or, visit our website to learn more about Colombia Adoption by clicking here!

NYC Pride March 2018: Save the Date

Spence-Chapin staff and community have participated in the NYC Pride March for a few years and always have a memorable experience! We’re thrilled to be walking in the March alongside LGBTQ parents, their families, and their allies again on June 24th and we invite you to join us!

There are multiple exit points throughout the march. Come walk with us for a few blocks or the entire route! Meet us at 120 Park Avenue – NW corner of 41st. Time TBD.

Marching contingents are given check-in and step-off times. We will wait in the formation area near Grand Central Station for about 2 hours before our group officially enters the march. If you join us, we encourage you to bring food, water, sunscreen, and other necessities. There are portable relief facilities and water filling stations at several points within the formation area.

We are located in the front of the middle section of the March. This means less time waiting in the formation area.

The march typically takes 60-90 minutes to travel from formation to dispersal area (near Stonewall Inn).

We are going to have a fun and rewarding day in the sun! It’s amazing to hear from spectators along the route about how they are connected to the adoption community.

All are invited to join us as we celebrate the LGBTQ community so bring your closest friends and family members.

Email to learn more and sign up!
To contact us on the day of the event call: 917-885-1477.

February: Black History Month

Spence-Chapin has been a leader in African-American and Black infant adoption and recruiting African-American adoptive parents. In honor of Black History Month, we revisit the efforts made by those who have fought to break barriers, making African-American and Black children from all parts of the world a focus and a priority.

Adoption at Spence-Chapin

In the 1940’s, Gladys Randolph, former director of Social Work at Harlem Hospital, brought the issue of boarder babies languishing in her community without families to the attention of Spence-Chapin. Challenging the then-popular notion that African-American families were not interested in adoption, Spence-Chapin started a program in 1946 to respond to the crisis. Working hard to tackle this misconception, in 1953, the agency elected Mrs. Jackie Robinson, wife of the famous baseball player Jackie Robinson, to serve on the Board of Directors. She played a crucial role in recruiting African-American families and as the movement gained momentum, more illustrious Americans, including Ruth Harris (wife of political scientist and Noble Peace Prize winner Ralph Bunche), Marian Anderson (celebrated American singer), and Willetta S. Mickey (wife of Civil Rights pioneer Hubert Delaney) helped Spence-Chapin recruit African-American adoptive families.

Eleanor Roosevelt was the featured speaker for a Spence-Chapin conference in 1954. Mrs. Roosevelt was quoted in The New York Times as saying, “No matter what the color of their skin, all our children must be looked at as the future rich heritage of the country.”

In 1991, adoptive parents of African-American children formed the Spence-Chapin African-American Parents Advisory Committee, known as AAPAC. The group, which welcomes all families parenting African-American, Black, bi-racial, and multi-racial adopted children, brings families together for social networking and support. One of the positive outcomes has been the close ties formed by members and their children, and the sense of community which has evolved among families.

Today, Spence-Chapin continues our mission of finding adoptive families for all children in the New York tri-state area and abroad as well as recruiting African-American, Black, bi-racial, and multi-racial adoptive parents.