Nelson Mandela Day: 67 Minutes of Change

Nelson Mandela: Civil Servant, Activist, Political Prisoner, President. Mandela’s living legacy is an inspiring and unique story, one of devotion to positive social change and justice for others. Many of us recognize Nelson Mandela as the man who became president of South Africa after spending 27 years in prison, but his incarceration has little to do with his impact on the world. In 1993 Mandela was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his key role in ending the apartheid regime peacefully and safely.

He was relentless in his mission to end apartheid in South Africa, and even after that goal was accomplished, he remained dedicated to helping others in need. As president he enacted a number of progressive social reforms, including the introduction free healthcare to children, and the launch of the successful Reconstruction and Development Programme that built over 1 million houses for those living in poverty-stricken slums, called townships.

After his political retirement, Mandela has continued to act as a voice for inspired change and the common good. His commitment to changing the world for the better has lasted almost 7 decades, 67 years! In commemoration of his achievements and dedication, the United Nations has endorsed “Nelson Mandela International Day” on July 18th, his birthday.

Today, people around the world are asked to use at least 67 minutes of their own time, in honor of Mandela’s 67 years of activism, in service of their communities.

Here at Spence-Chapin, we’re deeply inspired by Nelson Mandela’s leadership and legacy, because we’re always striving to do the best work possible to help those in need. Currently, our International Adoption Staff is in South Africa learning from our partner at Johannesburg Child Welfare, visiting our Grannies, and sharing information to create a new adoption program in the country that will help many of the 1.5 million orphans in South Africa.

We know that if everyone tries, we can make this world a stronger, better, and happier place. What will you do with your 67 minutes?

Post a Comment:

*